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37th World Championships

Though Russia emerged clearly as the dominating team in the International Shooting Union's 37th World Championships, fired in Moscow Aug. 18 through 25, the U.S. team performance in scores, though not in victories, was considerably improved over those in previous postwar World Championships. The accomplishments of Lt. Daniel B. Puckel, USA, and Lt. Verle F. Wright, USA, in the 300-meter event; of SFC Nelson H. Lincoln, USA, in the 50-meter slow-fire free-pistol match; of Capt. William W. McMillan, USMC, in the 25-meter center-fire pistol match; and of Lt. Joe A. Deckert, USAR, in the running deer match were particularly outstanding. Only in the English match, introduced into World Championships at the request of the U.S. and Great Britain to provide an event similar to the Dewar course popular in those countries, did the U.S. team's performance fall below that of previous years. Admiration must be expressed for the excellent scores fired by Russian shooters, particularly the new team records established in the free-pistol and silhouette rapid-fire pistol matches.

The U.S. team arrived in Moscow on Aug. 13. The arms and ammunition arrived the evening of Aug. 14, and on the morning of Aug. 15 the team reported to the ranges for practice.

For the rifle and pistol matches the Soviet Union had constructed, at a reported cost of $1,100,000, the Dynamo Range 15 miles northeast of Moscow. This range occupies approximately 185 acres and has separate ranges for 25 meters, 50 meters, 100 meters, 300 meters, and running deer, all facing north. The ranges are separated from one another by walls and high dirt banks, and are capable of being used at the same time. The shotgun events were fired on the Locomotive Range 11 miles east of the city.

U.S. team preparations

The shooting team which the U.S. entered in the 37th World Championships in Moscow was the first representing this nation in postwar International competition that had been afforded the opportunity to train and shoot as a team. The members of the team were selected after nearly 3 weeks of final tryouts at Ft. Benning, Ga., in June. Team members remained at Ft. Benning for team practice until their departure for Europe on July 14.

After arrival in Wiesbaden, Germany, on July 15 the team engaged in 3 weeks of intensive practice and team matches with West Germany, Sweden, Switzerland, and Austria, gaining further experience in firing as a team against stiff competition.

The team left this country fully equipped with suitable arms for International-type shooting. The pistol team was equipped with Haemmerli free-pistols, Hi-Standard rapid-fire pistols, and Colt and Smith & Wesson revolvers for the center-fire event.

The rifles accompanying the team were more diversified than the handguns. This equipment consisted of .22 cal. Haemmerli free-rifles; rebarreled Winchester and Remington rifles, chambered for the .308 cartridge, for use in the 300-meter event; and the Winchester Model 70 rifle in .22 Hornet, the Remington Model 760 rifle in .244 cal., and the new M14 in .308 cal. for running deer shooting.

In addition, the team carried with it experimental free-rifles in .308 cal. made by Winchester and Remington. These arms are the result of extensive consultation with shooters experienced in International match firing and these 2 arms manufacturers.

The Winchester rifle is built on a solid rectangular receiver and fitted with the standard Model 70 bolt, which is completely enclosed except for an opening through which loaded rounds may be inserted and the fired case removed. The action contains an extractor but no ejector. The fired case is simply removed with the finger. The bottom of the action is flat and is bedded in fiber glass for maximum rigidity, being held by 2 screws. The barrel is designed to give maximum shoulder bearing against receiver and is free-floating in the stock. Sights are offset to the left of the barrel to avoid as far as possible the mirage which rises from the barrel during firing. The arm is fitted with an entirely new double set trigger, adjustable as low as 3/10 oz. with complete reliability.

Arms of winning teams

What about the arms used by the winning teams in the 37th World Championships? The small bore and free-rifles used by the Russians were all bolt actions. The 300-meter arm was their M-13 and the small bore their M-12, made and stocked so as to be similar in shape and balance. The M-12 rifles were used in the English match also.

The Czechs, the Russians, and most other foreign teams in the center-fire pistol event used Smith & Wesson K-38 revolvers. Hi-Standard and Smith & Wesson pistols were used by nearly all teams in the silhouette rapid-fire event. The free-pistol used by the Russians was not identifiable by our shooters. It is aid to be an arm of Russian manufacture with some outward resemblance to the Haemmerli and a sliding bolt like that of the Shultz & Larsen.

New events added

This year, for the first time, the International Shooting Union included in the program World Championship events for juniors and ladies. These were all small bore rifle matches. At 50 meters there were individual and team championships for juniors and ladies which consisted of 30 shots prone, 30 shots kneeling, and 30 shots standing. Team entries consisted of 3 shooters from each country. The English match at 50 and 100 meters for ladies and juniors was individual compeitition only, with a maximum of 6 shooters from each country being allowed. The definition of juniors for this year's matches, under ISU regulations, was any one born in 1938 or later. The U.S. had no entrants in these classes.

The Championship Badge competitions are interesting features of World Championships. These are qualification tests, fired over courses similar in every respect to the courses of the World Championship events but consisting of fewer shots. For example, the 300-meter free-rifle Championship Badge event consisted of 20 shots in each of the 3 positions. Gold, silver, and bronze medals are issued to those shooters who attain specific scores as listed in the match program. The required scores in the 300-meter free-rifle Championship Badge competition are: Gold - 550; silver - 540; bronze - 530. Championship Badge competitions are scheduled for each arm and each course of fire in the World Championships.

According to the reports of U.S. team members and officials, the matches were well conducted. Range facilities and range operation were good. Minor difficulties and temporary slow-downs in the conduct of the matches were occasioned by the language barrier. All in all, the Russians are to be credited with the conducting of good matches.

The U.S. team performance was better than it has been in previous postwar International matches. The intensive planning and preparations for the 37th World Championships has paid off, though not in the winning column. Lt. Col. Walter R. Walsh, USMC, head coach of the 1958 U.S. International Shooting Team, has commented that the U.S. can get out of the equipment scramble - that all we need to win is to develop shooters.

American Riflman, Vol. 106, No. 10, October 1958

Team Photo

U.S. International Shooting Team

Rifle Members

Lt. Daniel B. Puckel, USA AMU; Lt. Verle F. Wright, USA AMU; Lt. James S. Carter, USA AMU; Lt. John C. Herr, USA AMU; Lt. James A. Eberwine, USA AMU; S/Sgt. Emmett D. Duncan, USMC; T/Sgt. James E. Hill, USMC; Sp2 Justus Allen, USA AMU; Cpl. William N. Rabenstein, USA AMU; Lt. Frank Briggs, USMC and Gordon J. Taras (Alternate)

Pistol Members

SFC Nelson H. Lincoln, USA AMU; M/Sgt. Roy L. Sutherland, USA AMU; CWO Offutt Pinion, USN; Lt. David C. Miller, USA AMU; SFC William B. Blankenship, USA AMU; Capt. William W. McMillan, Jr., USMC; M/Sgt. Huelet L. Benner, USA; SFC Aubrey E. Smith, USA AMU and CWO Victor E. Maass, USA AMU (Alternate)

Running Deer Members

Lt. Joe A. Deckert, USAR; Lt. Richard D. Wentworth, USA AMU; James F. Davis and Harry A. Lucker

Shotgun Members

Chesley J. Crites (Captain); Edwin C.L. Calhoun; Edward R. Harris; Kenneth L. Pendergras, USN; Waddell F. Smith; Mrs. Carola Mandel; Leon Mandel and Jay J. C. Schatz

Trap Members

Homer E. Clark (Captain); E. O. Sessions; Francis J. Eisenlauer; Col. Wyeth C. Everhart, USAF; Mrs. Evelyn Primm and Stan R. Danekas

Team Mangement & Support

Officials

ISU Representative: Lt. Gen. Floyd L. Parks, USA (Ret'd); Team Captain: Col. Perry D. Swindler, USA (Ret'd); Executive Officer: Lt. Col. Sidney C. Carpenter, USA; Head Coach: Lt. Col. Walter R. Walsh, USMC; Transportation Officer: Col. Peter W. Agnell, USAF; Press Representative: Carl E. Kastner; Supply Officer: Lt. Richard D. Wentworth, USA AMU; Adjutant: Lt. Joseph Masuck, USA AMU; Armorer: M/Sgt. Glenn C. Baker, USA AMU; Supply Sgt.: S/Sgt. Albert W. Mauser, USMC; Interpreter: Capt. Otis E. Brannon, Jr., USA; Pistol Coach: Maj. Benjamin C. Curtis, USA AMU; Ass't Pistol Coach: Lt. David Cartes, USA AMU; Running Deer Coach: Capt. Irving Lubotsky, USA; Rifle Coach: Maj. Paul H. Shultz, USA AMU; Ass't Rifle Coach: Capt. Joesph E. Riggs, Jr., USMC; Ass't Rifle Coach M/Sgt. Jack R. Beach, USA AMU

Document Document Document Document

World Shoot Set, U.S. Chances Slim

WASHINGTON, June 21 - Armed Americans will enter Russia this summer, ready to shoot it out with the Soviets. It's all right, though - even with the Kremlin.

Marksmen from some 20 other countries will join the gun-totin Americans for the 37th World Shooting Championships at Moscow.

It will be a surprise if the USA wins, and this irks Lt. Gen. Floyd L. Parks.

Parks, a retired from the Army, is executive director of the National Rifle Association of America. He got angry at the showing of American marksmen in the Olympics in Melbourne two years ago. And it's been bothering him ever since.

U.S. shooters, from a country where 13 million men and women fire for sport every year, captured only one third place medals at Melbourne. These Russians, and other Europeans, knocked the traps right out from under us.

Parks Busy

For two years Parks has been calling old pals at the Pentagon, writing gun and ammunition manufacturers and prodding rifle and pistol clubs to get back on target.

Actually, Americans have been also-rans in world shooting competition since the 1920s. They've been under the handicap of firing stock weapons with hard-pull triggers, produced with safety foremost in mind. Meanwhile hot shots in other lands have shattered bull's eyes with 'free' guns.

These elaborate pieces are fitted out with hand, arm and shoulder supports, delicate sights, hair triggers that click if you breathe on them, and sliding weights to provide just the right balance.

Specialized Shooting

"Propaganda-wise," Parks said today, "the world doesn't know that this is a specialized type of shooting that we are not used to."

Now U.S. firms are turning out experimental guns to match the foreign shooting irons. And, promoted by the rifle association, a real campaign is on to train highly skilled marksmen.

About 120 are currently engaged in tryouts at Ft. Benning, Ga. Most are Army men. Some represent the other armed forces, border patrols and police forces. A few are civilians. From 23 to 25 competitors will be selected for the trip to Russia with 14 trap and skeet shooters named by their particular associations.

Unknown newspaper, June 22, 1958

Marine Gets Rifle Berth'

Capt. William W. McMillan of the Marine Corps Recruit Depot Rifle Range will be one of four U.S. entries in the International Rifle and Pistol Team matches in Moscow in August.

McMillan won the rapid-fire match with a .22-caliber pistol in the U.S. International Rifle and Pistol team final tryouts at Fort Benning, Ga. His grand aggregate was 2,355 out of a possible 2,400.

The MCRD officer also set a national record with 594 out of 600.

Evening Tribune, June 27, 1958

News Photo

Marine Marksmen Take Aim at Reds

By MEL ZIKES

Four Marine Corps Recruit Depot marskmen left for Europe early this week with an eye on the Russians and their weapons in their hands.

The plan when they left was to shoot against the Reds, not at them.

Capt. William W. McMillan, Jr., headed the quartet, which included Lt. Frank F. Briggs, T.Sgt. J.E. Hill and S.Sgt. Emmett D. Duncan.

They are members of a 48-man U.S. team which left Ft. Benning, Ga., for competition in Germany, Sweden, Switzerland and Finland and then the World Championships at Moscow the second week of August.

All four are members of the fabulous marksmanship training unit at MCRD. The MTU members are the best shots in the Corps and some of them, like McMillan, are among the best in the world.

McMillan is the country's top rapid fire pistol marksman and has bettered international records four times.

Briggs, Hill and Duncan won spots on the 300-meter highpower rifle team. All have won marksmanship championships and bettered course records in several states.

Lt. Col. Walter R. Walsh will coach the U.S. team. The two other MCRD Marines on the team are Capt. J.E. Riggs, an assistant coach and S.Sgt. A. W. Hauser, an assistant armorer.

Three of their fellow MTU members cracked the shooting "sound barrier" last week. T.Sgt. Delbert O. Faulkner, T.Sgt. Michael Pietroforte and Sgt. Dale C. Stone fired "possibles of 250x250 on the 600-yard National Match Course for rifles.

There's no line on how the troops are supposed to do in international competition, but you can be happy that they are on our side.

Unknown newspaper, June 1958

McMillan Ties For Top Spot

MOSCOW, Aug. 21 (AP) Marine Captain William McMillan of Turtle Creek, Pa., and Vladimir Kudrna of Czechoslovakia tied for first place in the full bore revolver and pistol match for the Venezuela Cup here today as USA marksmen finally moved into the winning column of the International Shooting championships.

At the same time Francis J. Eisenlauer of Palo Alto, Cal., won the world trap shooting title with a score of 289 out of 300. He beat a pair of Italian marksmen, a Greek and a Briton by a single point. Captain McMillan and Kudrna, each with 586, will shoot off for the pistol title tomorrow.

Mrs. Carola Mandel of Chicago, the new European skeet champion, was qualified by the International Skeet Commission to compete in the world title matches starting here August 23. The only woman to qualify, she won a silver medal in the qualification round.

The USA team finished third in the full bore pistol and revolver team competition with 2,317 points. Russia was second to Czechoslovakia with 2,320.

Unknown newspaper, August 21, 1958

U.S. Marksmen In Win Column

Moscow (AP) - U.S. marksmen finally moved into the winning column of the International Shooting meet yesterday. They blasted out an individual world's trap shooting title and tied Czechoslovakia for individual first place in the full bore pistol event.

Francis J. Eisenlauer of Palo Alto, Calif., won the world trap shooting title with a score of 289 out of 300. He beat a pair of Italian marksmen, a Greek and a Briton by a single point.

In the full bore revolver and pistol match for the Venezuela Cup, Marine Capt. William McMillan of Turtle Creek, Pa., and Vladmir Kudrna of Czechoslovakia, ended in a dead heat for first, with 586 points each. They will shoot off for the title today.

Troy Record, August 22, 1958

Turtle Creek Marksman Leads U.S.

A Marine captain from Turtle Creek has topped all U.S. pistol marksmen in the world shooting tourney at Moscow.

Capt. William McMillan fired a 587 yesterday in the small bore rapid fire event. It was the top score registered by a team of nine GI marksmen from this country.

The Marine officer from 1810 James St. was chosen to fire on the U.S. team in the 37th World Shooting Championship in Russia because of his past performances on scattered target ranges.

Despite Capt. McMillan's dead eye the Russian marksmen dominated the competition. They won five gold medals in addition to the Kruger Trophy for the team championship in the running deer event.

Unknown newspaper, August 23, 1958

Marine Captain Proves Best Shot

MOSCOW (AP) - A pistol packing Marine captain from Turtle Creek, Pa., won the world hand gun championship and a heap of applause in the international shooting competition Friday.

Capt. William W. McMillan, 29, now stationed at San Diego, Calif., matched shots with Czechoslovakia's Vladimir Kudrna in a shoot-off of their tie score Thursday for first place.

Capt. McMillan won with a score of 296 out of 300 in rapid fire, three points ahead of Kudrna.

Morning Herald, August 23, 1958

Marine Captain Wins World Hand-Gun Title

MOSCOW, (AP) - An American Marine captain from Turtle Creek, Pa., won the world hand-gun championship in the international shooting competition here.

Capt. William W. McMillan, 29, stationed at San Diego, Calif., matched shots with Czechoslovakia's Vladimir Kudrna in a shoot off of their tie score for first place.

McMillan won with a score of 296 out of 300 in rapid fire, three points ahead of Kudrna. His victory for the U.S. ended a series of Soviet victories in the world competition.

McMillan's achievements give him the Venezuelan Trophy and the title of world pistol and revolver champion formerly held by T. Ullman, of Sweden, who won the title at Caracas in 1964.

Czechoslovakia set a world mark of 2,326 in the revolver and pistol match for the Venezuela Cup, beating by 2 points the old mark set by the Soviet Union at Bucharest in 1955.

West Germany won its first world title of the series when young Peter Kohnke scored 849 out of 900 in the 50-meter small-bore rifle championship for juniors. Second was C. Loncar, Yugoslavia, 848, and third, M. Ferecuru, of Romania, with 846.

The Soviet Union won the team match for juniors with 2,527 points out of 2,600. West Germany was second with 2,513 and Yugoslavia third with 2,511. The American team did not take juniors to Moscow for the shootings.

In another championship event, the Soviet Union and Communist bloc nations swept the small-bore 50-meter rifle events for women.

In the individual contest, T.S. Lamava, of the Soviet Union, was first with 851 out of 900 points. The Soviet tam took first with 2,630 points. Hungary was second with 2,494. Czechoslovakia was third with 2,486.

Earlier, Francis J. Eisenlauer, of Palo Alto, Calif., won the world trap shooting title with a score of 289 out of 300, beating a pair of Italian marksmen, a Greek and a Briton by a single point.

The Soviet Union won another world title by beating Italy in a shoot off for the world trap-shooting team championship, 95 to 99.

Highlight of the shotgun matches was the perfect performance of a 50-year-old Argentine engineer, Pablo Juan Grossi, of Buenos Aires, who smashed 100 clay pigeons without a miss in the final leg of the individual championships.

Stars & Stripes, August 24, 1958

McMillan Takes Mr. World Pistol' Title In Moscow

The Corps "Mr. Pistol" became the World's Mr. Pistol last Friday paid a heap of applause in Moscow.

Captain W. W. McMillan, Marksmanship Training Unit, won the world hand gun championship in the international shooting competition against the best pistoleers from through-out the world.

The 1955 Lauchheimer Trophy winner and last year's US record shattering pistol champion matched shots with Czechoslovakia's Vladimir Kurdna in a shoot-off of their tie score Thursday for first place.

Capt. McMillan won the shooting with a 296x300 score in rapid-fire, three points ahead Kurdna.

Mr. Pistol's achievements earned him the Venezuelan Trophy and the title of World Pistol and Revolver Champion.

The captain is slated to visit the Camp Perry National Match now under way, before returning to San Diego.

MCRD Chevron, August 29, 1958

Marine Cops World Title

MOSCOW. - Marine Capt. William W. McMillan has gained a world pistol crown to add to the many U.S. titles he already holds.

McMillan, of Marksmanship Training Unit, San Diego, took the hand gun championship in the international shooting competition here when he fired 296x300 in rapid fire. He edged Czechoslovakia's Vladimir Kudrna by three points in a shoot-off of their first place tie.

McMillan's feat gave him the Venezuelan Trophy and the world pistol and revolver championship.

Navy Times, August 30, 1958

News Photo

Shoot-Out In Red Square Won By Turtle Creek Gunslinger

Pistol Scores 586 Out of Possible 600

By NICHOLAS KNEZEVICH

Known as a champion gunslinger in Moscow's Red Square these days is a Marine captain from way out west in Turtle Creek.

William W. McMillan, 29, of 1810 James St., has just returned after copping honors in the pistol and revolver class in the International World Shooting meet at the eight-milllon-dollar Moscow firing range.

"It's the plushest range outside of the $15 million job in Caracas, Venezuela, I've ever seen," says Capt. McMillan, "And those Russian marksmen are whisked away from their families a year before the meet to practice eight hours a day, seven days a week."

Small wonder that the Reds took first place in team competition, followed up by the U.S. aggregation. However, five Americans came away with top individual honors.

"Bill" McMillan equaled a world's record, set at the last International four years ago by a Swede, a 586 score out of a possible 600.

This from one who as a child shot himself in the hand with a B-B gun and lost a rifle title because he shot at the wrong target.

When he entered the Marines in 1946, Capt. McMillan was "just average" on the firing range. Since then he has plunked over 300 medals and 30 championships.

The U.S. has been taking part in the international for only the last decade while most of the competing 32 nations in last month's meet have had teams longer than this county has been a nation.

"We have other jobs to do and only bear down about two months before a meet," the Captain who is stationed at San Diego noted.

Another Western Pennsylvanian in the 53 men and one woman U.S. team was Marine Capt. Joseph Riggs, 37, of Waynesburg, who coached the rifle squad.

Capt. McMillan's feat rated a personal letter from the Marine Corps Commandant, Gen. Randolph McCall Pate who noted: "You displayed stamina and fortitude which enhanced the prestige of your corps and country in the eyes of a watching world."

Turtle Creek area civic and veterans' organizations were watching also and have proclaimed next Wednesday "Captain McMillan Day" with a banquet to honor the champion in Churchill Country Club, at 6:30 p.m.

While in Russia, Bill McMillan did some observing of his own. The most disconcerting thing was that Red marksmen whom he competed against never smiled.

"They meant business. But it wasn't that way with the satellite teams from Romania, Czechoslovakia, Yugoslavia and Poland. Those guys really have a sense of humor."

He declared, the Russians didn't have better equipment than ours, but they were dedicated to their weapons. They even have doctors . . . beats and the respiration of their men while competing.

Although visiting teams were afforded freedom to roam Moscow, Bill said he and a pay almost created an international incident when they turned up an alley.

"I intended to take some photos of the slums off the main streets. We didn't get very far until two police officers were at our heels yelling, 'Nyet, Nyte'."

And the Captain asserted that he couldn't help feel every time he entered the "beautiful" Moscow subways, that it has been placed 200 feet underground for an added reason - bomb shelters.

Pittsburgh Press, September 1958


News Photo

Capt. William W. McMillan, Jr., USMC, holder of over 35 National outdoor pistol records, heads a list of 1958 shooting champions. He won a number of local and State tournaments, and topped the year off with the center-fire world title at the 37th World Shooting Championships at Moscow, Russia. McMillan (center) is receiving the winner's accolade for his center-fire achievement and is flanked by V. Kudrna (l.), Czechoslovakia, who placed second, and K. Takacs (r.), Hungary, third. McMillan recently equalled his 2652x2700 record at San Diego.


Russian News Article

World Champion
William
McMillan
(USA)

Russian News Article
25 Meter Rapid-Fire Pistol
Individual Scores
Rank Name Country Total Points
1 Aleksandr Kropotin USSR 592
2 Alexander Zabelin USSR 592
3 Stefan Petrescu Romania 589
6 William W. McMillan, Jr. USA 587
8 Huelet L. Benner USA 587
21 Aubrey E. Smith USA 575
22 David C. Miller USA 575

(Source: ISSF & USA Shooting Results)


25 Meter Rapid-Fire Pistol
"Helsinki Cup"
Rank Country Total Points
1 USSR 2361
2 USA 2319
3 Hungary 2317
4 Romania 2309
5 Finland 2293
6 Bulgaria 2273

(Source: ISSF Results)


USSR Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2361

(Source: ISSF Results)


USA Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 William W. McMillan, Jr. - 587
2 Huelet L. Benner - 582
3 Aubrey E. Smith - 575
4 David C. Miller - 575
Team Total: 2319

(Source: ISSF Results)


Hungary Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2317

(Source: ISSF Results)


Romania Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2309

(Source: ISSF Results)


Finland Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2293

(Source: ISSF Results)

Bulgaria Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2273

(Source: ISSF Results)


25 Meter Center-Fire Pistol
Individual Scores
Rank Name Country Total Points
1 William W. McMillan, Jr. USA 586
2 Vladimir Kudma Czechoslovakia 586
3 Károly Takács Hungary 585
6 Huelet L. Benner USA 584
17 David Cartes USA 574
18 Aubrey E. Smith USA 573

(Source: ISSF & USA Shooting Results)


25 Meter Center-Fire Pistol
Shoot Off
Rank Name Country Score
1 William W. McMillan, Jr. USA 296
2 Vladimir Kudrna Czechoslovakia 293

(Source: ISSF Results)


25 Meter Center-Fire Pistol
"Venezuelan Trophy"
Rank Country Total Points
1 Czechoslovakia 2326
2 USSR 2320
3 USA 2317
4 Sweden 2304
5 Finland 2283
6 Romania 2271

(Source: ISSF Results)


Czechoslovakia Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2326

(Source: ISSF Results)


USSR Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2320

(Source: ISSF Results)


USA Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 William W. McMillan, Jr. - 586
2 Huelet L. Benner - 584
3 David Cartes - 574
4 Aubrey E. Smith - 573
Team Total: 2317

(Source: ISSF Results)


Sweden Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2304

(Source: ISSF Results)


Finland Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2283

(Source: ISSF Results)

Romania Team
Rank Name Hits Total Hits/Points
1 - - -
2 - - -
3 - - -
4 - - -
Team Total: 2271

(Source: ISSF Results)



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